Tag Archives: direct mail

The true secret of the Yes/No response

Big TickI received a marketing email today from an expert in direct marketing, in which he wrote about sorting out the dead ducks from those who are really interested.

He referred to the Reader’s Digest Yes and No reply envelopes.

He called it the Yes/No option, implied that it was how to sort out the ones who are not really interested, and went on to say that is does not work in face to face selling.

I agree with that, but I believe he got it slightly wrong about the Reader’s Digest envelopes. Their intention was not merely a Yes/No option to separate tyre kickers from real prospects.

In direct mail, your objective should be to encourage response. Even negative response.

The more Noes you attract, the more Yeses you’ll get as well.

Encourage people to reply, and you have a dialogue going. That develops the relationship. Along the way, you’ll tip some Undecideds into the Yes camp as well.

Test it. Run one stream with a straight Yes or No response, and another which allows everyone to respond, some with an order, some without one. That’s what a Prize Draw does. Everyone can enter, whether they order or not.

In face to face selling the same thinking applies. In my Five Key Questions for Sales people, the fifth question is: What’s the least you will settle for?

It’s about planning for a fall-back option if you do not get the sale. Something to keep the door open, to maintain a dialogue and develop the relationship.

That’s the real secret behind the so-called Yes/No option.

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Filed under copywriting, Direct Marketing, Sales

7 Key elements of Direct Mail

Post boxes

1. The List comes first
• Who is your target market?
• Must be relevant to your product or service
• Is the Database up to date, accurate, fully named?

2. Make the envelope look right
• Use a stamp not a franking machine
• Make it look like personal correspondence
• Don’t put sales messages for the sake of something to say

3. Create an offer that’s hard to resist
• You must MAKE AN OFFER
• Address the question, What’s in it for me?
• Make a ‘soft offer’, i.e. one that requires minimal commitment. If you require a ‘Yes/No’ response it’s a Hard Offer.

4. Aim to create ACTION
• Always have a response device
• Write the response device first
• Give a compelling reason to reply

5. Stop expecting only a 1% return
• With the right ingredients you CAN get double digit response
• Avoid trying to convert non-users
• Focus on getting users (others’ customers) to switch to you

6. Testing can make all the difference
• How will you know what works? By testing
• How will you know what works BEST? By testing
• Use a rolling test programme to stay ahead of the game

7. Monitor your results
• Things change. So keep your eye on all results
• Change only one key element at a time and note the effect

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Filed under Direct Marketing

10 ways to transform your sales letters

Big Tick

Do you write letters for business? What happens to them?

We all write letters. Some of them are emails, some of them are to sell our products or services. Most of it is junk mail, and therefore a waste of time and money.

Consider the junk mail you receive. What makes it junk? Is it because the product or service being offered is of no value to you, or some other reason? Do you reject it out of hand within, say, 3 or 4 seconds? Well, perhaps that’s exactly what happens to the letters you send out. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

If your letter is dumped immediately, you have wasted your time and money.

If your letter gets read and then dumped, you have not only wasted your time and money, you have also begun the process of training others to ignore you.

What’s worse is the low level of expectations. I once saw a testimonial from an SME thanking a copywriter for increasing their conversions from 0.58% to 0.7%. Although that was a 21% improvement, it was still a 99.3% failure rate!

There will almost always be a high rate of wastage, but you can improve your results quite easily, and at no extra cost.

Here are 10 elements to include in sales letters to transform results:

  1. Strapline: at the top of the page, it sets the scene for the Headline’s ‘come on’.
  2. Headline: absolutely essential, it must contain your strongest ‘come on’ and is worth 90% of your budget. (What – you don’t have a headline?!).
  3. Sub-heads: these are short headlines in bold type that break up the text and project a series of benefits, while making it easy for readers to skim read.
  4. Problem/solution: the best structure.
  5. Stories: they illustrate your message in memorable ways and allow you to make your points indirectly.
  6. Bullet points: use these to make your letter more visually interesting.
  7. Testimonials: third party endorsements are powerful.
  8. Transitions: these bridge the gaps between different ideas and maintain the flow.
  9. Call to action: Always tell people what to do next, but first make sure you have given them enough reasons to accept your offer.
  10. PS: this is the third most read part of a sales letter (after the Headline and salutation) and should never be omitted.

In addition, elegant language and good grammar play important parts, but I assume these are ‘given’. The 10 points listed above are all in the armoury of good copywriters.

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Filed under public speaking

Have you considered Database Marketing?

 

Small businesses don’t always have a Marketing Plan. And when someone suggests Database Marketing, here’s what they often ask: “Isn’t Database Marketing only for the big boys?”

The answer is No. You do not need an expensive system to set up a Database. You can use a simple spreadsheet to record the essential information about your customers.

These are the details your system should record:

Recency: date of last purchase

Frequency: how many purchases made

Money: total spend with you so far

Average order: Money divided by Frequency

Trend: are the Frequency and Average rising or falling?

Your marketing should focus on Recency, Frequency and Money – the RFM factors, as they are called in Direct Marketing.

Those who bought from you recently, and often, are the ones most likely to buy from you again, because they have accepted you as a preferred supplier, and do not need much reminding of the benefits of doing business with you.

And those who buy frequently could quite readily be persuaded to shorten the gap between purchases or to order something new between their regular purchases.

The total money spent with you will also determine how important they are to your business, and how profitable.

Obviously, Recency, Frequency and Money will have different values in different businesses.

For example, the gaps for buying computers will usually be much greater than for consumables like stationery.  You should monitor all gaps and learn what is normal for each type of product, not only among your own customers, but in the industry.

It adds important information to your Database – information that can guide your Marketing decisions.

The other factor to consider is creativity – copywriting and design.  Start with an email to admin@pkpcommunicators.com or call 0845 165 9240.

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Filed under Marketing